GCC Course Matching

The faculty members teaching the courses listed below would like to offer their course as a Globally Connected Course in the 2019-20 academic year and are looking for a course partner from an Alliance institution. If you are interested, please contact the instructor to explore the possibility.

International Organization, Bill Gelfeld, International Relations, Universidad San Francisco de Quito

Latin American Politics, Annie Dandavati, Political Science, Hope College

Women, Human Rights, and Social Movements in Latin America, Maria Claudia Andre, Modern and Classical Languages, Hope College

Genero y Sociedad, Cheryl Martens, Social Sciences and Humanities, Universidad San Francisco de Quito

Literature and the Environment, Ernest Cole, English, Hope College

Literature and the Environment, Ashutosh Potdar, Fine & Performing Arts and Literary and Cultural Studies, FLAME University

Participative Narration, Alejandra Zambrano, College of Social Sciences and Humanities, Universidad San Francisco de Quito

Freshman Composition, Emilienne Akpan, Department of English and Literature, The American University of Nigeria

Oral Narratology, Ravikant Kisana, Department of Literary and Cultural Studies, FLAME University

The Choreographer I, Balinda Craig-Quijada, Dance, Drama, Film, Kenyon College

Composición, Marcela Correa, Área de Artes Escéncas-Colegio deCcomunicación y Artes Contemporáneas, Universidad San Francisco de Quito

Children, families, and the welfare state, Gina Dow, Psychology, Denison University

Service-Learning, Karla Diaz, Service Learning, Universidad San Francisco de Quito

Basic Writing Skills, Jacqoline Austin, English Language and Literature, Forman Christian College

Freshman Composition, Emilienne Akpan, Department of English and Literature, The American University of Nigeria

Physiology, Taylor Allen, Department of Biology, Oberlin College

Audio Production, Kim Fox, Journalism and Mass Communication, The American University in Cairo

Policy & Technology for Urban & Rural Sustainability, Chong Xiao, Office of Service-Learning, Lingnan University

Introduction to Entrepreneurship, Muhammad Khan, Entrepreneurship, Effat University

Border Epistemologies, Adriana Garriga-Lopez, Anthropology/Sociology, Kalamazoo College

Politics of the Global South, Zaynab El Bournoussi, Internatiional Studies, Al Akhawayn University

Global Literature: Narrative, Identity, and Transformation, Guilianna Zambrano, Literature – College of Social Sciences and Humanities, Universidad San Francisco de Quito

Advanced Topics in Psychology: Narrative, Identity, and Transformation, Felix Diaz, Philosophy and Psychology, The American University in Bulgaria

Psycholinguistics, Rebekah Rast, English, American University in Paris

Orality, performance, and indigenous resistance, Antonia Carcelan-Estrada, Social Sciences and Humanities, Universidad San Francisco de Quito

Developmental Economics, Kanish Debnath, Economics, FLAME University

Economic Development, Belinda Mambos, School of Business and Social Sciences, International University of Grand-Bassam

Economics of Development, Galina An, Economics, Kenyon College

Introduction to French Language and Culture II, Krastanka Bozhinova, Arts, Languages, and Literature, American University in Bulgaria

Beginners French II, Pierrette Sansone-Bares, French and Francophone Studies, Earlham College

Design Innovation for impact, Spring 2020

Dr. Albert Ko, albertko@ln.edu.hk, Lingnan University

The course will take a deep dive into understanding community challenges. Hands on workshops with various theoretical and practical methods like design thinking and Lego serious play will be used to develop potential solutions. The course will take up one community challenge which groups of students will work towards understanding and by the end of the course would have gone through one iteration of ideation, prototyping and testing the solution. The challenge will involve community partners as co-designers of the solution. The solutions can take one of the various forms; behavioral change, product, mobile application, policy proposal, service, innovation of process, etc. [Expected enrollment: 25]

Humanitarian technology for Sustainable Development Goals, Spring and Fall 2020

Dr. Albert Ko , albertko@ln.edu.hk, Lingnan University

Most challenges faced by communities today can be solved with technology which is mature and easy to use. Taking this line, students will get a deep understanding of how relatively inexpensive and mature technology like Arduino, solar power, 3D printing and others can pave the way to providing a technological tool kit for students. This can empower the students to take up challenges locally and internationally providing them with confidence to pursue career prospects in the fast-evolving technology and social landscape. An overview of Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to aid students to achieve a deeper understanding of global challenges at the macro-level. This will be complemented with specifically designed challenges at the community level to help the students grasp the gravity of how simple technology can change the world we live in. [Expected enrollment: 25]

Orality, performance, and indigenous resistance, Spring 2020

Antonia Carcelen-Estrada, acarcelen@usfq.edu.ec , Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Fall 2019

This course explores how indigenous memory passes down from one generation to another by means of orality to contest a national memory of the past that is exclusive and violent. While history advances meanings and practices central to the colonial matrix of power, people “without history” contest such cultural hegemony by proposing alternative meanings and practices with the hope of redefining social power in and through their own textual and artistic practices. Encoding knowledge against the grain of the imposition of a national (white or mestizo) cultural hegemony requires an appropriation of the public sphere and a reorganization of collective memory through a performance that can transmit memory otherwise. [Expected enrollment: 25]

GLAXXXX Global Business and Management, 2019-20 second semester

Paul Whitla, Whitla@ln.edu.hk, Lingnan University

This course examines the changing world of international business and the impact that globalization has had on the amount and the nature of international trade and investment. It also considers the impact of continuing globalization on the growth strategies of multinational corporations and how they conduct their international business activities.

Part one defines globalization, describes its drivers, and debates its merits and drawbacks.

Part two focuses on national differences in culture and ethics and the implications of these differences for ethical decision making in international business.

Part three presents a review of international trade theories and describes the trade and investment environment in which international business occurs.

Part four examines alternative market entry strategies that businesses adopt and the strategic choices available for international competition.

Part five examines the functional activities of multinational companies

[Expected enrollment: 25-30]

Solving community problems through media and art, Spring 2020

Cristina Castrillon, mcastrillon@usfq.edu.ec, Universidad San Francisco de Quito

“Solving community problems through media and art” seeks to make students become managers of communication projects that have a positive impact on society through innovative solutions to real problems within social-urban contexts. The workshop is an open learning space in which students plan and develop projects of community interest. The workshop addresses a specific driver theme throughout the semester could be power abuse, gender, immigration, political corruption, people manners, cultural aspects, etc, the topics vary and can be shaped to mutual needs. The students are organized in groups and develop the projects throughout different tasks that includes research, fund rising, media approach, legal advisory, activation in a public place. Finally, the whole class choose one project with the highest level of incidence and all of them contribute to the creation of a creative final project with possible solution proposals.[Expected enrollment: 20]

ECON 200-level Globalization and the Economy, Spring 2020

Allison Roehling, allisonroehling@depauw.edu, DePauw University

This course will enhance student understanding of how the organization of the global economy and global economic integration has affected developed and developing economies. We will study global organizations (such as the World Bank, World Trade Organization, International Monetary Fund, and regional banks) from an economist’s perspective, answering questions such as: what is their purpose?; what structural relationships do they impose on countries?: what are their pros/cons/limitations? We will also critically consider the implications of economic integration — international trade, migration, and capital movements — in developed and developing economies on economic growth and economic well-being. [Expected enrollment: 25]

CIV 111 Women & Gender in Africa, Spring 2020

Jennifer Lofkrantz, jennifer.lofkrantz@aun.edu.ng, American University in Nigeria

This course will explore gender and the history of women in Africa in a cross-cultural perspective. We will examine the depiction of women by historians and in popular culture. We will analyse and discuss how contemporary historians, anthropologists and other academics have viewed women’s roles with regards to such topics as power, religion, slavery, marriage, sex, and love. Specific themes include constructions of gender, LGBTQI rights, sexuality, reproduction, the household, women’s economic activity, political power, religious roles, colonialism, and democracy. [Expected enrollment: 20]

HUM 2311 Indigenous Futurism, Spring 2020

Keino Campbell, Esq., campbell.k@iugb.edu.ci, International University of Grand Bassam

This interdisciplinary course examines how the future is thought and imagined in Indigenous cultures, including African, Chinese, and Native American. Science Fiction and the Futures industry are promoted through Westernized binoculars. This is limiting, but Indigenous-Futurism, like Afrofuturism, allows us to look at the world through an unfamiliar cultural lens which enables us to project alternative futures and then chart present possibilities within an indigenous context. This is done by futuristically viewing Indigenous religion, culture, history, mythology, cosmology, and science fiction as expressed in indigenous-centered literature, film, art, architecture, and music. Students participating become innovative, free-thinkers in the present. [Expected enrollment: 30 Students]

BUSA 423 International Finance, Spring 2020

Esther Laryea, ealaryea@ashesi.edu.gh, Ashesi University

The course aims at providing students with a basic understanding of the international financial market, and multinational finance and investment. This course extends the basic principles of corporate finance to dimensions peculiar to global financial markets and multinational corporations. It is designed to cover areas of international finance such as the international financial markets, international parity conditions, foreign exchange determination and quotations, derivative securities for currency risk management, and management of the risk of multinational operations. Thus, beside the discussion of issues of corporate finance such as working capital management, capital budgeting, risk and returns, and cost of capital from the perspective of multinational enterprises, additional issues such as international monetary system, currency derivatives, exchange rate changes and regimes, and political risk are also covered. [Expected enrollment: 25]

Economics of Development, Spring 2020

Galina An, ang@kenyon.edu, Kenyon College, Spring 2020

Students examine the economic conditions and problems of developing economies, exploring alternative theories of economic development and strategies for achieving development goals. Specific topics include the meaning of development; historical and theoretical perspectives; income distribution; agriculture, population and human resources; industrialization, employment and technology; urbanization and migration; foreign trade, investment and aid; and government planning. Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102. [Expected enrollment: 25]

Orality, performance, and indigenous resistance, Spring 2020

Antonia Carcelen-Estrada, acarcelen@usfq.edu.ec , Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Spring 2020

This course explores how indigenous memory passes down from one generation to another by means of orality to contest a national memory of the past that is exclusive and violent. While history advances meanings and practices central to the colonial matrix of power, people “without history” contest such cultural hegemony by proposing alternative meanings and practices with the hope of redefining social power in and through their own textual and artistic practices. Encoding knowledge against the grain of the imposition of a national (white or mestizo) cultural hegemony requires an appropriation of the public sphere and a reorganization of collective memory through a performance that can transmit memory otherwise. [Expected enrollment: 25]

ENGL 131: Text and Meaning, Second Semester 2020 (Spring 2020)

Kaneisha Gaston Arhin, karhin@ashesi.edu.gh, Ashesi University, Spring 2020

The course takes a fresh approach to the study of literary and critical theory, integrating critical thinking into class activities to increase the students’ ability to learn and question. It is designed to teach students critical thinking skills and how to pose questions, propose hypotheses, gather and analyze data, and make arguments. In order to accomplish this, the term “text” is used in its broadest possible sense and includes literature, newspapers, magazines, speeches, advertising, websites, blogs, film, music and documentaries. Put simply, Text and Meaning encourages students to do their own intellectual fishing, instead of waiting to be served. [Expected enrollment: 50]

Language instruction offers an excellent opportunity for a Globally Connected Course. The longest running course connection has been between German courses at the American University in Bulgaria and Denison University. German is not the native language for students on either campus, so they have the same sets of challenges. Since language courses are sequenced, there is also the opportunity for students to have several connected courses together and to get to know each other.

Languages (PDF)