GCC Course Matching

The faculty members teaching the courses listed below would like to offer their course as a Globally Connected Course in the 2021-22 academic year and are looking for a course partner from an Alliance institution. If you are interested, please contact the instructor to explore connecting their course to a course you teach. Visit the Global Course Connections page for information on how to submit a course description and how to submit a connection proposal.

Introduction to Civic Engagement
Khadija Kaj-Itani, [email protected], Effat University
This course prepares students to understand and analyse the circumstances of people facing a variety of problems and challenges, and to develop strategies that will help to improve these circumstances or reduce their impact. It seeks to train students to help communities solve their problems: helping communities to cope with a drought, or supporting a family where a parent has died or is seriously ill. It also focuses on helping people with long-term problems: the poor, the aged, the chronically ill, families who are dysfunctional, and others. This course is community-based. Students will work in groups on particular projects on campus or the surrounding community chosen in consultation with the professor, as well as read and write on civic engagement.[Expected enrollment: 20-25 students]

World Religions
Pankaj Jain, [email protected], FLAME University
This course is to share an informed appreciation for the religious life of humankind as this is reflected in some of the most influential religious traditions in the world, such as Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Shinto, Daoism, and Confucianism. [Expected enrollment: 30]

HS324 – Magic and Witchcraft in Medieval and Early Modern Europe
Fabrizio Conti, [email protected], John Cabot University
This course examines the rise and decline of beliefs in magic and witchcraft “the supposed power of humans to intervene in natural events and to harm others by supernatural means” in medieval and early modern Europe, up to the outburst of the so-called “witch craze.” It studies social, cultural, literary, judicial, religious, gender, economic, and environmental aspects of these beliefs, and their roots in such things as classical Greek and Roman literary traditions and popular folklore. 

Students will analyze primary sources in English, such as early literary texts elaborating on witch beliefs, the infamous handbook for inquisitors, Hammer of Witches, the records of early modern trials, and intellectual reflections on the reality or otherwise of magic and witchcraft, and a variety of contemporary historiographical explanations. Students will thus be helped to frame magic and witchcraft in their historical, anthropological, environmental, sociological, and intellectual contexts, and to enrich their understanding the evolution of medieval and early modern European societies and cultures.
[Expected enrollment: 15]

EN / HS 315 Selected Topics in American Literature: A History of African American Literature
Carlos Dews, [email protected], John Cabot University
This course pairs the consideration of significant historical documents relevant to the lives of those of African descent in the United States of America with the literary texts written by them, to provide both a survey of African-American literature and a history of African Americans in America. From the publication in 1773 of the first book written by an African American (Phillis Wheatley’s Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral) and the drafting of the Declaration of Independence in 1776, to Martin Luther King Jr.’s 1963 “I Have a Dream” speech and the signing of the Voting Rights Act by President Lyndon Johnson in 1965, the course will consider the major literary works, including poetry, fiction, drama, and nonfiction, written by African-American writers, and the social and political contexts in which they were written. [Expected enrollment: 20]

ECON-305 Public Sector Economics
Shujaa Waqar, [email protected], Forman Christian College
This course covers the theory of public sector economics, that is, the role of the government in the functioning of the economic system. The course focuses on the topics such as role of public sector, theories of public goods, externalities, distribution equity and economic welfare, concepts used in taxation, types of taxes and their shifting and incidence, resource mobilization, public expenditure evaluation, public debt, external debt modeling, budget deficit, cost-benefit analysis of development finance. [Expected enrollment: 35]

GEO2302 Political Geography
Eric Ross, [email protected], Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane
This course studies the spatial deployment of power through analysis of political entities, identities, and interests at different scales. Emphasis is placed on the State, with definitions of national sovereignty, territory, and borders. Domestic governance and civil administration are also discussed. International institutions and agencies are analyzed in relation to contemporary economic activities, trade, resource management, and environmental monitoring, and in relation to conflict and conflict resolution. Students are required to conduct bibliographic research and to write a number of essays and papers. [Expected enrollment: 15-20]

DAN 1001 Improvisation
Marcela Correa, [email protected], Universidad San Francisco de Quito USFQ
This course connects students with their bodies and leads them in the exploration of unplanned movement, creativity and imagination while dancing. Through readings and discussions, the course aims to both free the body and open the mind into more spontaneous and playful relationships to others and to the world at large. [Expected enrollment: 15]

Community Nutrition
María Belén Ocampo, [email protected], Universidad San Francisco de Quito USFQ
Evaluate the nutritional situation of diverse communities and propose public health solutions that adapt to their reality. Students will learn about available tools that will allow them to come in close contact with the community they work with and gather information on cultural beliefs and practices, built environment, health situation, disease prevalence and incidence, resources and readiness. This information will inform students about the reality of the community and will allow them to work together with members to propose a solution that will be sustainable and successful. Additionally, students gain insight in topics such as plain language, nutrition education and nutritional counseling to adequately speak to the lay population.  [Expected enrollment: 25]

Core 1099 Entrepreneurial Leadership and Critical Global Issues
Nellie El Enany , [email protected], The American University in Cairo
The world is facing unprecedented critical issues including poverty, government accountability and corruption, income inequality, climate change, unemployment and migration and more recently the Covid-19 global pandemic. This course will take a close look at global issues through an experiential entrepreneurial and leadership lens, developing your ability to think strategically and systematically about different scenarios, and how to unpick them innovatively, creatively and courageously. Through hands-on experience applications, exposure to entrepreneurs and key figures from business and society, analysing in-depth current topics and key theory as a critical reader and writer, this course aims to develop students into future entrepreneurial leaders and changemakers. [Expected enrollment: 20]

BADM 3003 Business Environment and Ethics
Nellie El Enany, [email protected], The American University in Cairo
This course offers various perspectives on the business environment and the ethical issues facing organizations face. It also discusses organizational responses to environmental and ethical issues, the social responsibility of organizations and societal challenges. [Expected enrollment: 20 per class]

GRMN 101
Farid Ahmad, [email protected], Forman Christian College
German A1 ( Start Deutsch 1) Communicate in a simple manner if the person you are speaking to talks slowly and clearly, understand and use familiar, everyday and common expressions and simple sentences (e.g. information about yourself and your family or about shopping, work and your immediate surroundings), introduce yourself and others, as well as ask others about themselves, e.g. where they live, who they know and what they own. [Expected enrollment: 20]

SOC 295: Social Epidemiology
Shanna Corner, [email protected], Hope College
States of health and disease vary across people and groups within a given population. In this course, we examine social factors – such as socioeconomic status, race, gender, work conditions, neighborhoods, and social networks – that contribute to health disparities in the United States, as well as in other countries. As part of this examination, students will be introduced to key theoretical perspectives and research methods used within social epidemiology. [Expected enrollment: 10-20]

BUSA 451 Development Economics
Stephen E Armah, [email protected], Ashesi University
This course discusses the problems faced by Least Developed Countries (LDCs) and Lower Middle-Income countries (especially in Africa, Asia and Latin America) and their efforts to improve the lives and well-being of their people. It incorporates different aspects of the development process including traditional development topics like economic growth, education, population studies, rural-urban migration and poverty studies as well as less traditional but equally pertinent topics like economic and political institutions, competition policy, foreign aid, culture and corruption. [Expected enrollment: 30]

ARTS400 – The Social Turn: Art and Social Engagement
Sobia Zaidi, [email protected], Forman Christian College
Social turn was first used in 2006 to describe the recent return to socially engaged art that is collaborative, often participatory and involves people as the medium or material of the work. The course is an artistic exploration of socially engaged art through practice and theory. This course will include the key critical and disciplinary debates in order to understand art which involves people and communities in debates, collaboration, or social interaction. The students will understand the meaning of collaboration as well as the significance of participation of communities in making art and how it guides the creative process. They will look at the development art and its discourses critically. Students will also understand practice through engagement by collaborating with communities and designing research backed art projects. One of the aims of this course is to investigate the conception, process and materialization of art within society and its impact on society. Students will be engaged in debates concerning ethics of public interventions and creative collaboration and in some cases its discontents. [Expected enrollment: 20]

English 234: Mental Health: An Interdisciplinary Perspective
Ernest Cole, [email protected], Hope College
This course focuses on mental health narratives and the cultural representations of mental illness in selected African novels. It traces the historical perspectives, cultural connections and belief systems associated with mental health in the literature of former British colonies in Africa and others with cultural connections to the Middle East in order to address stereotypes, trauma, exclusion and isolation, and stigmatization associated with the mentally ill. The proposal draws from the literature of Sub-Saharan Africa to explore the inequities, social disparities, and trauma of mental health along four constructs of disorders: character disorders, including anxiety disorders and phobias; mental disorders, including depression, bipolar disorder and mood swings; post-traumatic stress disorder; and psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia. [Expected enrollment: 25]

PSY402 Advanced Topics in Psychology: Narrative, Identity, and Transformation
Felix Diaz, [email protected], American University in Bulgaria
This course focuses on narrative, identity, and life transitions, relying on social theory, qualitative research and oral history. It involves students in applied research, including fieldwork, interviewing, transcription, case analysis and comparative analysis. Students will focus on cases illustrating one of four vital problematics: displacement/migration, ethnic/national identity, sexual orientation, and/or parenthood. The course activities include selecting an interviewee, passing and transcribing an interview, analyzing it and contributing to comparative analysis in small groups. The assessment system is based on practical, applied and research tasks, including peer interaction across the two connected courses. [Expected enrollment: 10-15 students]

Core 1099 Entrepreneurial Leadership and Critical Global Issues
Nellie El Enany , [email protected], The American University in Cairo
The world is facing unprecedented critical issues including poverty, government accountability and corruption, income inequality, climate change, unemployment and migration and more recently the Covid-19 global pandemic. This course will take a close look at global issues through an experiential entrepreneurial and leadership lens, developing your ability to think strategically and systematically about different scenarios, and how to unpick them innovatively, creatively and courageously. Through hands-on experience applications, exposure to entrepreneurs and key figures from business and society, analysing in-depth current topics and key theory as a critical reader and writer, this course aims to develop students into future entrepreneurial leaders and changemakers. [Expected enrollment: 20]

BADM 3003 Business Environment and Ethics
Nellie El Enany, [email protected], The American University in Cairo
This course offers various perspectives on the business environment and the ethical issues facing organizations face. It also discusses organizational responses to environmental and ethical issues, the social responsibility of organizations and societal challenges. [Expected enrollment: 20 per class]

BUSA 423 – International Finance
Esther Laryea, [email protected], Ashesi University
The course aims at providing students with a basic understanding of the international financial market, and multinational finance and investment. This course extends the basic principles of corporate finance to dimensions peculiar to global financial markets and multinational corporations. It is designed to cover areas of international finance such as the international financial markets, international parity conditions, foreign exchange determination and quotations, derivative securities for currency risk management, and management of the risk of multinational operations. Thus, beside the discussion of issues of corporate finance such as working capital management, capital budgeting, risk and returns, and cost of capital from the perspective of multinational enterprises, additional issues such as international monetary system, currency derivatives, exchange rate changes and regimes, and political risk are also covered. [Expected enrollment: 20-30]

BUSA 454 Africa and the Oil Industry
Stephen Armah, [email protected], Ashesi University
This course will introduce students to the history of the global oil industry, the emergence of the oil industry in Africa, how colonization influenced the process, the economic and environmental ramification of Africa’s dependence on oil despite environmental and sustainability-related concerns, and the link of the oil industry to corruption and development in Africa. The recent Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) revolution in the in the USA and developed countries led by Elon Musk’s Tesla that has dampened the demand for oil in developed countries but is largely absent in Sub-Saharan Africa is a dichotomy in the oil industry whose consequences for Africa a a major exporter and consume of oil will also be explored [Expected enrollment: 30]

Language instruction offers an excellent opportunity for a Globally Connected Course. The longest running course connection has been between German courses at the American University in Bulgaria and Denison University. German is not the native language for students on either campus, so they have the same sets of challenges. Since language courses are sequenced, there is also the opportunity for students to have several connected courses together and to get to know each other.

Languages (PDF)